Publisher Mockup. Final version subject to change.

Publisher Mockup. Final version subject to change.

ONE WEEK: AFRICA

RWANDA / UGANDA

Photographer, writer, avid traveler, and now author, Ty Jennings, takes us along as he fulfills a lifelong dream of traveling to Africa, a childhood promise unfulfilled. In the Summer of 2016, Ty was invited to follow the founders of two charitable organizations changing the way humanitarian aid is defined and delivered. With unprecedented access, Ty spent ONE WEEK traveling over 800 km by van, minibus, boat and bush plane between Rwanda and Uganda as each founder conducted meetings, checked in on the status of their projects, and paved the way for future endeavors. Seeing elephants, hippos and other safari life along the way.

Featuring a Foreword by Jay Wahl, Artistic Director of The Kimmel Center, Philadelphia - ONE WEEK: AFRICA (Rwanda/Uganda) is filled with over 170 photographs and more than a dozen essays, musings and observations by the author as he documents a trip most people would need weeks to accomplish, if they dared do it at all - ONE WEEK: AFRICA (Rwanda/Uganda) is a visually rich, emotionally honest and touching tribute to a series of unpredictable moments and experiences, nearly halfway around the globe. All in under a week.

Publisher: AquarianStar Art Books
AVAILABLE ON AMAZON - MAY 2017

 
 
 
Tote bag available separately.

Tote bag available separately.


Photos

With over 100 photos, spread across 140 lush pages, bound in hardcover, the stunning visuals take the reader on a journey from landscapes to candid human moments, wild elephants to wild fires - Ty Jennings has captured many weeks worth of experience, in ONE WEEK. Many photos taken from the road, while traveling over 800 km through Rwanda and Uganda by van, bus, boat and bush plane 

Essays

Over a dozen essays, written specifically for ONE WEEK: AFRICA. From memories to contemplations on humanity, race and politics, ONE WEEK: AFRICA tells multiple stories from the author's point-of-view, looking back on his life and what the concept of Africa meant as a child growing up, to what it means now against the ideas of current state of race, privilege, and global citizenry.